Samples Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence Essays

Description of the event Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to gain some insights and manage individual emotions and those of people around you as a leader (Derue, Nahrgang, Wellmanv & Humphrey, 2011; Nahavandi, 2014). Notably, leaders with emotional intelligent know what they are feeling, what those feelings imply, and...

880 words 3 page(s)

To begin with, emotional intelligence can be defined as an ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions. While some scientists tent to believe that people are born with genetically predefined ability to control and evaluate emotions, other tend to believe that it can acquired through learning as someone grows and...

595 words 2 page(s)

The literature on leadership has grown with regard to the importance of self-awareness and emotional intelligence, and for good reason. When leaders are impulsive or controlled by their emotions they do not make good decisions. This is especially relevant with respect to crisis management. The importance of self-awareness to leadership...

1566 words 6 page(s)

As a result of globalization, today’s multi-national corporations operating in an ever changing competitive world must look to promote leaders that are capable of dealing with the intricate challenges that are involved with cultures that are often vastly different than their own. In an article titled “Global Leadership success through...

1042 words 4 page(s)

Agenda Define the concept of emotional intelligence and explain why it is important. Talk about the five components of emotional intelligence (EI), defining/explaining each of them (self-awareness, self-regulation, social skills, empathy, and motivation). Describe why emotional intelligence is important in healthcare management. Executive Summary Emotional intelligence is one of the...

413 words 2 page(s)

As many scholars and business coaches emphasize the importance of well-developed emotional intelligence along with intellectual abilities it is clear that improving oneself in this sense will yield benefits in the future, especially if one plans on taking a managing role later in life (Morton, 2012). It was very informative...

359 words 2 page(s)

According to Salovey and Mayer (1990), emotional intelligence encompasses a number of different skills including affect regulation, emotion identification, and the ability to use these emotions and regulation skills to help with aspects of planning and life. According to authors such as Goldman (2006) emotional intelligence can be a more...

543 words 2 page(s)

Emotional intelligence has become an important concept for human relations. Emotional intelligence is the ability to focus on self-awareness, control impulses, and show self-motivation and persistence. It is also the ability to offer empathy and understanding to others (Goleman, 1995). Goldman has argued that emotional intelligence may be more important...

384 words 2 page(s)

The process of self-evaluation is an essential step in the overall application of leadership. In some cases, it may initially seem that these two terms do not go together but essentially they complement one another. Leadership cannot exist without a critical evaluation of one's actions. In many ways, the more...

338 words 2 page(s)

While social intelligence is defined as one’s capacity for interpersonal communication, emotional intelligence relates to one’s awareness of one’s own emotions and ability to show empathy and understanding of the emotions of others. Social workers are typically called on to employ both aspects of intelligence in their casework. Oftentimes, social...

397 words 2 page(s)

The study author examined the role emotional intelligence plays in the work-life balance of foster care workers. In so doing, he/she felt that there was a statistically significant relationship between emotional intelligence and the days an individual was absent from work. That was one of the research questions. In order...

971 words 4 page(s)

Definition Emotional intelligence is typically described as a means of expressing emotion in the workplace in a variety of contexts that include caring, coaching, mentoring, motivating, and nurturing, among other characteristics, to achieve greater success, to establish and maintain effective relationships, and to acknowledge the importance of support and engagement...

613 words 3 page(s)

Emotional intelligence is the capacity individuals have to recognize both their emotions and others’, something particularly important in an organizational setting. Similarly, it allows people to discern and discriminate between different feelings, being capable of correctly labeling them (Salovey and Mayer, 1990). From that perspective, emotional intelligence serves as a...

1241 words 5 page(s)

Introduction Emotional intelligence is defined as the ability to comprehend emotions, evaluate emotional information, and then, using that comprehension and evaluation, to enhance thought process (Mayer, 2009). In addition, it is correlated that emotional intelligence allows a person to respond to another’s emotions instead of reacting to them, even in...

881 words 3 page(s)

Daniel Goleman’s book, Emotional Intelligence, is an essay on the evolutive and biological causes of contemporary societal problems, ranging from common bad manners to the alarming increment of violent crimes and depression, and, just as much, a guide to building up our capacity to comprehend our own emotional lives in...

670 words 3 page(s)